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  • #16
    Remember you can always wipe it off and do it again and repetition seems to improve the results. It helps turn red rust into a kind of loose slush, which you can scrape off as Ian says, one benefit, but it also provides a thin protective invisible shield, sealing the black or russet iron surface.
    Last edited by Teppotai; 07-03-2018, 10:38 PM.
    Piers D - Japan / UK

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    • #17
      Sean, I just use the oil and regular mineral spirits. Word of caution, a rag covered in linseed oil wadded up can catch fire on it's own. My father is a carpenter and uses this stuff on furniture. The chemical process of it drying causes heat and when wadded up, no place to dissipate, and poof, the rag spontaneously combusts. So, disposal of the rag should be considered carefully. Also, if you have any gas fireplaces, and do this trick in the winter, the VOC's that are emitted from the mixture drying will get amplified by the gas fireplaces, and make your eyes and lungs miserable for a while. But there is no better treatment that I've found for sabiji..
      Justin Grant - USA

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      • #18
        I've used boileld inseed oil for years on woodwork, just never a mixture like this on metal. I remember always keeping my linseed oil rags flat and letting them dry.
        Sean Zapara - FL, USA

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        • #19
          Hi gentlemen,

          I'd like to ask questions about "Boiled Linseed oil mixed with white spirit...." . I use linseed oil mixed with turpentine (essence de thérébentine) on wood. Turpentine helps the penetration of oil inside the wood fibers then it evaporates and the oil stays inside the wood. I suppose that white spirit plays the same role when the mixture is used on iron ?
          Now comes the first question : why boiled (not boiling) oil. Does it mean that the oil must be heated to the boil, then let to cool down, if so what is the purpose of the heating ? As for second question : is white spirit better that turpentine if used on iron ? I've never used this mixture on iron but the results shown on the different photos posted are convincing and I'm ready to give it a try...

          Thanks for any answer or comment.
          Daniel GONY - FRANCE

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          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            Dan, both good questions and I can partly answer both. (If no-one else answers!)

            White spirit is a term used in the UK but not I believe elsewhere, such as the USA or Japan. Google might be your friend there.

            Heating plays no part in our method. Boiled linseed oil is a product which you an buy that has been through a boiling process, and is sold as 'Boiled Linseed Oil', distinct from plain 'Linseed Oil'. I had trouble finding it in Japan; someone in the UK gave me a bottle to take back. I would not know how to reproduce that process starting with ordinary linseed oil, ...but that too can possibly found on YouTube etc.(?)

        • #20
          Dear Daniel,

          We can find some boiled Linseed oil in France in the shops ROUGIER & PLE.

          Best regards,

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          • #21
            Hi Piers and Gilles,

            Thanks for such quick answers, so it was my mistake about the word "boiled"...
            A quick research on the web taught me the difference between "raw" and "boiled" linseed oil. Raw oil is processed in order to get a Boiled oil (BLO) which dries much easier and quicker than Raw oil.

            Thanks to Gilles I even know where to buy BLO !

            By the way Piers, we do have "white spirit" in France (solvant for paint).

            I'll get some BLO, mix it with turpentine (better smell than white spirit) and give a try on iron.

            Best regards.
            Daniel GONY - FRANCE

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            • Teppotai
              Teppotai commented
              Editing a comment
              Daniel, it is easy to use too much, and the drying process can vary by days. I would recommend experimenting with brushes, and mixtures, and then trying it on bits of rusty iron until you feel confident.

            • Teppotai
              Teppotai commented
              Editing a comment
              PS In Japan I found a bottle of 'odourless white spirit artist's quality'.... made by Talens in the Netherlands.

              https://www.royaltalens.com/brands/t...te-spirit-089/

          • #22
            This has now become an excuse to get out the kit and treat the tetsu-sabi-ji on a menpo and a tanto fittings.

            Lots of lovely red stuff coming off...................
            Piers D - Japan / UK

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            • #23
              I loves posts.back from the dead. I did 2 Kabuto and 1 menpo before but I did them incorrectly. I failed to wipe it off enough so it has a glossy heavy look to it. Thankfully, some less diluted white spirits and it should all come back off Soni can redo it correctly.

              I never did get around to my Saotome Do before. It really needs work on some active rust spots and.then the full treatment. It also (from before it came to me) has active delamination issues in some places. Brittle bubbles of metal rising up from the surface. As far as.i understand the only preservation possible once that happens is to pierce them, scrape the bubble off and treat the active damage underneath. You loose some metal and it leaves the finished pockmarked but once metal bubbles up like that I don't think the smooth surface can be saved. Still , .better slightly pock marked than destroyed.

              The textile parts worry me more. It has a very delicate nanban European style ruffled collar. Similar to Portuguese collar from the 16th century or so. The material is whole but thin and in very delicate state. I'll leave conservation toon that to experts unless someone can give me some good suggestions.
              Sean Zapara - FL, USA

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              • #24
                I have heard that silk has a finite life so there is little you can do to save it when it breaks down organically. What material is your ruff collar?
                Piers D - Japan / UK

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                • #25
                  Incidentally, going back to the self-immolating danger cloth (!) above, I always use a small cup for the mixture, and apply it with an artist’s paintbrush which I wash each time.
                  Piers D - Japan / UK

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                  • #26
                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yq6VW-c2Ts

                    Apparently the drying accelerant added to boiled linseed oil is the culprit creating the exothermic reaction.
                    Last edited by Malcolm; 11-29-2019, 05:24 AM.
                    Pip Pip Cheerio

                    Malcolm

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                    • Teppotai
                      Teppotai commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Malcolm, you da man! High five!!!

                      Or should I say, an informative video. It's not just any old linseed oil, but our very own boiled version. Thank you for the sobering education.
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