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  • Stevei
    started a topic yatate

    yatate

    Another little interest of mine are yatate .... ink and brush sets..I will put more detail latter..just some pictures for now

  • Stevei
    replied
    Originally posted by Stevei View Post
    Got another one today....
    Story guys wrong picture ... correct one below...doh..

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  • Stevei
    replied
    I will have a look I’m sure my silver one does...I got another today

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  • KABUTO
    commented on 's reply
    Steve nice looking collection, I think Yatates are very interesting. I do like they are small, easy to display and have a variety of styles and finshes. I added one to my collection about a year ago. Would like to add just a couple more so always on the lookout for them. By chance are any of your marked on the inside of the lids?

  • Stevei
    commented on 's reply
    They are nice the netsuke ones , but tend to be expensive..show a picture please if you have time Piers..

  • Stevei
    replied
    Got another one today....

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  • Ian Bottomley
    replied
    Two points, In Nikko is a painting of the archers in a parade wearing utsubo or enclosed quivers. They all have a string tied to the loop of cord at the top rear of the ustubo, that I thought was for hanging the thing up when not in use, this string goes over the left shoulder and is tied to the obi. This keeps the thing hanging at the proper angle on the right hip. The quivers used in the Kamakura era were the ebira type,like a little armchair, and some do have a drawer in the bottom section. Secondly, some oda gote have the gourd shaped hyotan hinged to reveal a compartment for ink soaked cotton. Wher you put the brush is another matter entirely - perhaps Malcolm can explain that one.
    Ian Bottomley.

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  • BASARA
    replied
    Thank you for explaining it. I should learn.

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  • Teppotai
    replied
    This I did not know: "The name comes from the practice of early bushiwho kept ink stones inside their quivers." Very interesting. I wonder if an inkstone in the bottom compartment of their quiver helped keep the thing upright.

    You appear to have a good collection, Steve. I have two examples of the late-Edo separate inkbox Netsuke type, but suspended with string, not chain.

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  • Stevei
    replied
    Wiki has a pretty good explanation

    Yatate
    (矢立) are small personal smoking-pipe-shaped writing sets from medieval Japan which provided a carrying box for the ink cotton, and a shaft for a brush (and possibly a letter opener).Yatate literally means "quiver" ("ya-tate"). The name comes from the practice of early bushiwho kept ink stones inside their quivers.

    Japanese writing was traditionally done using the writing set inspired from China: an inking stone, a small stick of solid ink (sumi) (which is turned to usable liquid ink by grinding on the inking stone and watering), and brushes. The complete set was easily portable and took time to prepare the materials for writing.[1][2]

    A typical Yatate

    During the Kamakura era (1185–1333), the idea of ink-saturated cotton was developed. By touching a calligraphy brush to the cotton, one could ink the bristles with reduced risk of dripping or spilling ink. By enclosing the cotton in a little box ("sumi tsubo"), a writing set was made convenient and portable.

    The first yatate were long boxes, with the ink compartment in the axis of the pen. The "smoking pipe" shape was designed to increase the quantity of available ink. In the late Edo era, another design was developed, with the ink box attached to the pen shaft by a chain; the ink box was used as a netsuke to fix the yatate to the belt, while other yatate are simply put in the belt like a fan.

    As only members of the samurai caste were permitted to carry katana, some yatate were designed to be used for self-defense. Some late yatate were made of a special alloy of goldand copper called shakudo, specifically designed to turn purple-black over time, and give the yatate its finish.

    4 of those pictured are mine Jan ... including the blade and teppo shape...

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  • Teppotai
    replied
    Originally a Chinese idea, these were for carrying a brush and ink. Like a 携帯電話 Keitai denwa, they were 携帯 (keitai) portable, for pushing into your obi.
    Although they are called Yatate 矢立て, they have nothing to do with 'standing' or 'arrows'. 筆と墨入れ 'Fude to sumi ire' might have been a better word, but it is too long.

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  • BASARA
    replied
    For a long time, I didn't quite understand the name and usage of this thing. I don't understand it at all.

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  • Teppotai
    replied
    Lovely looking objects. One of those areas where you do or you don't collect, IMHO. For many years I kept my focus on Netsuke. Dealers often offer me yatate, but it seems such a deep area, and they can be fairly pricey if you do not know what you are doing, so I tend not to dip my toe here. I guess if you study calligraphy or painting, it would be a perfect area to investigate.

    Can you tell us something about them, Steve?

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  • Jan Pettersson
    replied
    I’ve seen a few of these sold as Hinawa-ire
    A perfect thing to collect. There are so many different styles, and they don’t take up much space.
    Is these ones yours, Steve?

    Jan

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  • Stevei
    replied
    My favourite one...

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