Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sakatsura Ebira at Tokyo National Museum

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sakatsura Ebira at Tokyo National Museum

    Good morning Katchubunnies.,

    Here are some snaps of an elegant quiver called Sakatsura Ebira, currently on display in the Tokyo National Museum:


    I know the circular basket woven object is called a Tsurumaki and holds spare bowstrings.

    What are the other parts of the ebira called?

    Here's how they were used in Heki Ryu Battlefield Archery:






    Attached Files
    Sakatsura Ebira Quiver Net which supports the individual arrow shafts Slats between which the Arrow points are held Tsurumaki which holds a spare bowstring
    Last edited by Malcolm; 11-25-2018, 08:30 AM.
    Pip Pip Cheerio

    Malcolm

  • #2
    Hi Malcolm,

    Good repport thanks to share

    A really nice sakatsura ebira , was used in official events and sometimes in battles of course by high rank samurai ... I think cause of thick/straight. It's cover with boar bristles (or bear) Interesting it traced back all along the ebira...
    ​​​​​​.
    Laurent
    Last edited by gui; 11-25-2018, 09:34 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Malcolm, that is an über cool video. I can see so many things common to gunnery, probably adopted partly naturally and partly in order to blend in with the other martial disciplines.
      Saw two Ebira like that for sale the other day. One was not good (modern?) but the owner would only sell them together.
      Piers D - Japan / UK

      Comment


      • Jan Pettersson
        Jan Pettersson commented
        Editing a comment
        Some of the hand movements are very similar between Okayama Teppo tai and what I see in this video.
        The rate of fire is also interesting and you can understand why teppo-units included yumi-shooters in order to keep up the rate of fire during reloads.
        Not sure I enjoy the shouting...

        Jan

    • #4
      I have a similar ebira but of deer skin that is rotting badly.
      Ian
      Ian Bottomley - UK

      Comment


      • #5
        Did you notice the thrust at the end of the video, somewhere I have seen a Yari blade that was designed to fit the end of the bow.

        Hazu Yari はずやり - 弭槍 I think they were called.

        http://photozou.jp/photo/show/203432...65/?lang=zh-hk
        Last edited by Malcolm; 11-25-2018, 02:03 PM.
        Pip Pip Cheerio

        Malcolm

        Comment


        • #6
          Interesting topic I would be happy to know more about the hazu yari .. Someone has more informations ? Apparently is exit with one or two yari mounted ??
          ​​​​​​.
          Laurent
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #7
            Wow, nice find, (even if a on Chinese site)! Actually I thought they were going to pull out their tachi to finish off the enemy.

            There is some debate as to whether they actually existed, but a dredge of Giggle finds: https://search.yahoo.co.jp/image/sea...81%A8%E3%81%AF
            Piers D - Japan / UK

            Comment


            • #8
              I positively sure that I somewhere read about these ”blades” that was mounted on yumi and used by the missile-troops as a close-combat weapon. But taking into account the construction of the bow, I guess it could not have been very durable, or easy to operate for that matter.

              Jan
              Jan - Sweden

              Comment


              • #9
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJVC6ExVUi4 found another video from the other side
                Dave Jackson
                B.C. Canada

                Comment


                • #10
                  I put a photo of my yumi only the top part to illustrate ...
                  The top parts of the yumi are bigger so If it was add a hazu yari several possibilities: the yari had a big metal part mounted on the wood laquered or the wood was cutting to put the yari. What do you think ??
                  ​​​​​.
                  Laurent
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by gui; 11-26-2018, 08:29 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    For once I manage to find the source regarding the ”blade” mounted on the yumi.
                    In a section of the Zohyo Monogatari, which is a sort a manual for the footsoldiers (ashigaru), written in the middle of the 17th century, the following text is found: ”Before bow fighting begins, fix a Hazuyari blade onto your bow” Later in the text: ”... so get close to the enemy, even closer than a spear’s length and shoot the last arrow targeting a gap within the opponent. Than stab with the blade which is fixed to your bow at the enemy’s face or any gap, such as an opening around the tasse - that is the skirt of the armor”.
                    So this Hazuyari seems to have been a last resort weapon before drawing your sword.

                    Jan
                    Jan - Sweden

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Here's the Zōhyō Monogatari 雑兵物語 at the National Diet Library:

                      It is a late printing in two volumes from 1846

                      http://dl.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/2609247?tocOpened=1


                      There may be an illustration of a Hazu Yari in one of Roald Knutsen's publications.

                      PS

                      Wow Jan!! I am in awe of your translation skill!!!
                      Last edited by Malcolm; 11-26-2018, 07:25 AM.
                      Pip Pip Cheerio

                      Malcolm

                      Comment


                      • Jan Pettersson
                        Jan Pettersson commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Wish I could speak Japanese as well as I read it...

                        Jan

                    • #13
                      A few days ago, I happened to be in the museum, too. On November 24

                      Comment


                      • #14

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Good photo basara
                          ​​​​​​.
                          Laurent

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X