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Danyaku-bako (ball n powder) box

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  • Danyaku-bako (ball n powder) box

    Carried on the battlefield with supplies in the various drawers. Musket ball, match cord, black powder both coarse and fine, etc.
    The shoulder harness was called Renjaku 連尺

    can anyone figure out what the numbers indicate?

    64F32F02-3C40-479A-AA09-61C85779F1F0.jpeg
    Last edited by Teppotai; 11-09-2019, 06:28 AM.
    Piers D - Japan / UK

  • #2
    And closed for carrying.
    . A1A98DFA-C44C-4A73-89DB-3B4A45E2D23F.jpeg
    Piers D - Japan / UK

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    • Dan
      Dan commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi !
      I wonder what could have been the weight when the drawers were full loaded, must have been rather heavy, no ?
      Thanks for the photos and comments, I'm learning a lot.

  • #3
    Cool box Piers!
    No clue about the numbers. Are there also a little 八 on each drawer down left? That might make sense together with the number on the lid?!
    Uwe Sacklowski / Germany

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    • Teppotai
      Teppotai commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, you are there really. Just wring those brain cells one more twist.
      Last edited by Teppotai; 11-09-2019, 10:39 AM.

  • #4
    ....
    Uwe Sacklowski / Germany

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    • #5
      Wring em, Uwe. Wring em

      This is one item that I still need in my collection. But the good one commands quite high prices. JPY 150-200000 is not uncommon (this is where you come in Uwe and say: it’s only printed paper)

      Jan
      Jan - Sweden

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      • Uwe
        Uwe commented
        Editing a comment
        😆..... will try!

    • #6
      There is another 八 on the inside of the "door", so my guess is that this box was number 8, and the drawers are marked to show that they belong (and, probably more importantly: FIT) with this box.
      Also, it would make sense if the supplies in each drawer were the same for every gunner in a unit. Like, you could be sure to find the balls in the first drawer, the cords in the seecond an so forth.
      David Mueller - Germany

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      • #7
        David has it. And as I said, Uwe was there, really...!

        This implies that there were at least eight similar ammunition boxes in their unit, and this is number 8.
        Each of the drawers, 1,2,3 & 4 also has a small #8 on it, so we know that everything fits together in that order from the top. Actually the door is very tight, (how tight? watertight? airtight?) so any slight difference would have meant that the door would not shut and the rain would possibly get in.

        (Many hinawaju matchlocks have similar markings on their various parts. I read somewhere recently that each castle would have an inventory and cleaning day where weapons would be dismantled and checked once a year. To avoid confusion with similar parts they were often numbered.)

        Notice how the drawer numbers go from top left, right, left, right.
        Last edited by Teppotai; 11-09-2019, 10:27 PM.
        Piers D - Japan / UK

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        • #8
          Originally posted by Teppotai View Post
          Notice how the drawer numbers go from top left, right, left, right.
          Oh yes, I saw that, but forgot to ask about it. Is there an explaination to this?
          David Mueller - Germany

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          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            There may be but the only thing I can think of is that the pattern somehow reinforces the message.

            Maybe the inspector finds it easier to check, not having to read the actual numbers. Just, "left, right, left, right, pattern seems OK!" (?)
            Last edited by Teppotai; 11-12-2019, 01:00 AM.

        • #9
          Marks, usially numbers, on gun parts are standard when they were part of a large consignment. Whilst they may have been added by the user, it is possible that they were put on by the maker. In the Birmingham gun trade, all the various components were made by out-workers, some in separate towns and villages, then brought together for finishing and assembly. Since the parts were hand made and differed slightly from each other, the assembler would select components that fitted together best and mark them - often by small nicks made with a file on an unimportant edge. They could then be finished and polished knowing they could be put back together without being mixed up. It is interesting that even the finest London guns were often made in Birmingham, assembled in working order, but finally finished and engraved by the London makers. Even machine made guns such as Colt revolvers, that were supposed to be built with interchangeable parts, needed minor adjustments and a bit of filing here and there to make them work properly. The cutting tools on the various machines wore down and needed re-sharpening from time to time, changing the geometry of the components that needed slight corrections during assembly - hence the stamping of the critical parts with serial numbers.
          Ian Bottomley
          Ian Bottomley - UK

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