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Hayago, quick-loading tubes

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  • Hayago, quick-loading tubes

    A tube. Filled in advance with one measure of black powder. (Thus you can avoid having to take time on the battlefield trying to pour correct amounts of powder into the muzzle.)

    The size of the hayago will depend on the size of your gun barrel and ball. (Pronounced Hah-yah-goh). A 10-Monme hayago tube will be quite a bit larger than a 6-Monme hayago, for example.


    Construction. Usually a simple tube with a stopper, examples can be found made of many different materials. Paper, wood, bone, bamboo, etc. Can be very plain like those used by Matagi (hunters) or beautifully lacquered and gilded, or anything in between. Some tubes were made in the shape of a fish or dragon.

    The bottom of the tube can be closed off in some examples, or open and designed to hold a single ball, either inside or outside the tube.

    You can string several together and hang them around the neck, a custom seen throughout the world, or they can sit inside a Doran waist pouch.. The complete string with two tubes would be called for example a 二発早合 Ni-hatsu Hayago.

    Please feel free to show your examples.





    Piers D - Japan / UK

  • #2
    Here’s three of my favorites. The one in the middle holds a 10 Monme ball that you can see protruding the top. At the other end is a cap equipped with a hole from were a string can be fitted. The whole thing is perfectly made. A testament to the skill of Japanese artisans.
    The two large ones on the flanks are my absolute favorites. Made to hold loads for O-zutsu. Probably near to 50 Monme. Everything in orginal condition.

    Jan
    Jan - Sweden

    Comment


    • Teppotai
      Teppotai commented
      Editing a comment
      Jan, those are fantastic and very rare. Even the BIG ten monme in the middle looks really small compared to those two WHOPPERS on either side!

      Your Mon/Kamon is the Omodaka of the Mizuno Han. Strangely, I am just about to leave the house for Fukuyama to hear a lecture about them today!

    • Jan Pettersson
      Jan Pettersson commented
      Editing a comment
      The two big ones can house some serious amount of black powder.
      That lecture sounds interesting. Take pictures if something catches your eyes.

  • #3
    Not “monme related”, but......the mon is called “Maru ni tachi-omodaka” and Piers nailed one of the possible houses!

    Guys, can you please give a layman an idea about the measurements of Jan’s hayago?
    Uwe Sacklowski / Germany

    Comment


    • #4
      The large pair measures about 15cm high with a circumference of just over 3,5cm.
      Judging by the quality of the kamon and the surface of the urushi, this set belonged to a samurai with status.
      As you can see from the picture, it’s fitted with connector to hold a string. I wonder if it was meant to be carried around the upper body?
      The 10 Monme Hayago is about 9,5cm high.

      Jan

      Jan - Sweden

      Comment


      • #5
        Whilst I had the doors open to my Teppo cabinette, I took out a Hayago from the other side of the spectrum, compared to the O-zutsu Hayago above.
        This was carried by a hunter and the Hayago holds enough gunpowder for 0,8-1 Monme load.
        Please notice the adorable ball-pouch that comes with the Hayago. It’s fitted with a small hole through which the wearer could get hold of a ball without removing it from his belt.
        I think this Hayago ties in well with the ongoing Wabi-Sabi topic on this forum

        Jan
        Jan - Sweden

        Comment


        • Teppotai
          Teppotai commented
          Editing a comment
          Jan, can you give us an idea of the measurement?
          Perhaps put three sizes, hunter tube, 10 Mon-me, and 50 Mon-me, side by side, with a watch beside them or something!?!?

      • #6
        For our displays we are given plastic 35mm film capsules of black powder in marked amounts. I prefer to use something as close as possible to what was actually used. Although I have various examples, I do not have any full serviceable sets of hayago. They tend to be somewhat fragile after a century or two anyway and need to be preserved rather than used.

        When the powder is handed out, I decant it each time into tubes made from bamboo growing in the woods here. So far I have made two sets, one of 10-gram loads for the army long gun, and another smaller 8-gram set for smaller bore guns.

        Yesterday I found some good sizes of bamboo, their growth slowing down for the winter, so I spent the day chopping and roasting them.
        Piers D - Japan / UK

        Comment


        • #7
          Your wish is my command
          In front I have added another small Hayago made entirely from horn. That one comes in a set of two and placed in two small pockets on a modified Muneate used for target practice or quite possible during an exhibition in front of the Daimyo, where shooters fired two shots at a target. Holds 1 Monme of gunpowder.

          Jan
          Jan - Sweden

          Comment


          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            Ah, now we are talking, Jan.
            By the way, how large is that pen...........................? (teeheehee)

        • #8
          Thanks Jan, that helped
          Uwe Sacklowski / Germany

          Comment


          • #9
            Two sets I mentioned above. 10 gram set on left and 8 gram set on right. Two with stoppers open. The stoppers are a wooden core bound in soft leather. 92D058AD-7349-4AAD-9D61-6E74DE77A4F1.jpeg
            Piers D - Japan / UK

            Comment


            • Uwe
              Uwe commented
              Editing a comment
              Pretty cool Piers!

            • Teppotai
              Teppotai commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks Uwe!

          • #10
            You already managed to get some patination going. I’m guessing that glossy finish is from heating up the bambo in order to get the natural oils to come out, followed by a good rub down?

            Jan
            Jan - Sweden

            Comment


            • #11
              Yes, Jan, all of that, and then I think I covered them in a single thin coat of lacquer. A few years ago, so I am struggling to remember!

              These are the ones I am playing with at the moment.

              The larger ones on the right are around 2.2, 2.3 cm in diameter, similar to a 20 or 30 Monme Tanegashima barrel. We can easily see why they called guns Tsutsu/Dzutsu, (= tubes).

              85B725A6-7B6B-41F4-94BE-176EFCC34CD4.jpeg
              Last edited by Teppotai; 11-05-2019, 01:55 AM.
              Piers D - Japan / UK

              Comment


              • #12
                Bamboo is a fantastic material to work with. Plus it patinates perfectly and lasts forever. You can’t go wrong with bamboo

                Jan
                Jan - Sweden

                Comment


                • #13
                  I agree, everybody know certainly the proverb "the bamboo folds but does not break" ..sorry, easy coment I know, but rare moment to place this proverb🙂
                  ​​​​​​.
                  Laurent
                  France
                  Last edited by gui; 11-05-2019, 09:16 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    The production line, based loosely on the original red 10-Monmé Hayago in the foreground. These are relatively larger tubes for a Samurai gun or Shizutsu. 士筒
                    Even bigger ones in the background..
                    . 3DA8B1AF-4F56-44C4-8D7E-95CA2A9397E3.jpeg
                    Piers D - Japan / UK

                    Comment


                    • #15
                      Looking really good! You managed to get the leather ”straps” to fit snuggly around the bamboo tubes.
                      You are set for future campaigns with the big samurai gun.

                      Jan
                      Jan - Sweden

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