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Gunpowder-flask for primer (Koyaku-ire)

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  • #31
    The other side...
    F1239BE0-0D32-447D-B332-808156234208.jpeg
    Piers D - Japan / UK

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    • #32
      Good morning Piers, Do I spy:

      Ken Katabami Kamon Picture 1

      Hira Izutsu or Igeta Kamon Picture 2

      ?



      Pip Pip Cheerio

      Malcolm

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      • Teppotai
        Teppotai commented
        Editing a comment
        You do indeed, Malcolm.

    • #33
      Sweet!!!
      Ako delivers once again 🙂. I will let someone else answer your question, but I can say that you def has the skills to reverse the ”modifications”.
      These high-end flasks demands high prices. I once bought a similar flask in very good condition for JPY30.000. Worth every yen 😎
      They are def made in the same workshop.
      Looking forward to follow the road to perfection.

      Jan
      Jan - Sweden

      Comment


      • Teppotai
        Teppotai commented
        Editing a comment
        Yours was expensive precisely because it was in good condition, Jan. Nothing better than an honest example, complete if possible with old (often rotting) string. The ones I restore here are for a new life in the teppotai, so they need good reliable cord to stand the strains. They get banged around quite a bit. During our re-enactments I carry mine in my Doran and tie it on just before the display starts. Otherwise it swings around and hits against the armour with every step of the procession.

    • #34
      Thanks Jan. I'll leave this open for 24 hours to see if anyone wants to start a list of answers to 1,2 or 3 above. (Word of warning. No.3 cannot really be answered from an outside view like that.)

      OK, time coming to an end, so it would make sense to start with No. 3, I guess. Later I will illustrate how it should look with the other of these twin flasks.

      *Why do I hesitate?
      Well, the bamboo top section is non-standard in function so it would have to be removed and replaced with two 'new' authentic parts. So....

      I can see evidence of modern epoxy(?) glue around the base of the narrow bamboo 'collar', (set above the 'ruff') which will be very hard to break without splitting/cracking things. I wish people would not use this stuff so liberally, as once it is in position, that's it, forever.
      The bamboo collar and cap are reasonably nicely done, with matching colours, possibly using an old bamboo brush holder, (even if they do not follow the remit for a priming flask).
      I really do not want to break anything, especially the original spout tube which is still thankfully intact.
      In order to authenticate this bamboo collar as it is, I would have to drill side holes through it for the strings, but the material is not thick enough, and neither is the cap above, so that plan would not work.

      So, I can leave it as it is and sell it on.
      Or I can attempt to destroy the bamboo collar and hope to scrape off all remaining vestiges of modern bond, leaving the tube intact. From there I would make a new neck and cap out of some lighter-coloured material like antler, bone, etc.

      And that, ladies and gentlemen, is the gamble.
      Last edited by Teppotai; 01-18-2020, 04:11 AM.
      Piers D - Japan / UK

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      • #35
        Here they are side-by-side. See the similarity of construction, but with small differences. Note the unusually deep internal locator prongs, and the fairly long pins. The ruff construction is not sophisticated with a curved but flat surface. See how the original black and gold lacquers were preserved under the ruff collars.

        B61A6BBA-65A7-44F6-A73D-A6EFF2CB8DF9.jpeg

        28A101F3-1E41-43F0-BF33-C343A065847E.jpeg

        Last edited by Teppotai; 01-18-2020, 07:20 AM.
        Piers D - Japan / UK

        Comment


        • #36
          You have a tough decision to make... When I see these last two pictures, I’m starting to lean towards ”leave it alone”. I feel the risk of damaging original parts is too big, especially as modern glue is involved. Risking damaging the original spout and collar is not worth it.
          Is it my eyes or do I detect some red urushi in the well-kamon? If so, this flask might one time has belonged to the Ii-clan as the used red and gold for their insignia.
          Looking forward to hear your final decision on this 🙂

          Jan
          Jan - Sweden

          Comment


          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            Step one. Watching a 1968 Clint Eastwood Western this evening, ‘Hang ‘em high’, I worked at the bamboo with a box cutter and finally managed to cut it all away.

          • Jan Pettersson
            Jan Pettersson commented
            Editing a comment
            Clint Eastwood is never wrong 🙂 I suspected that you would give it a go. Happy to hear that your skill with box cutter, paid off. Good luck with the rest.
            Talking about TV; isn’t it tomorrow that the new NHK Taiga drama ”Kirin ga Kuru” airs for the first time?

          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, indeed, Jan. I shall be watching it this evening with much interest. I heard a commentator suggesting that the mythical Kirin is Akechi Mitsuhide, but Hideyoshi must have been a Ryu, higher in the mythical creature rankings.

        • #37
          Hi Piers & Jan,

          Interesting article, I regulalrly encounter Antique items "Tastefully restored" by former custodians, using Epoxy type glues.

          I however, have access to Miserable Manny, the ubiquitous "Little man what does" (He is actually 5ft 2..... and never smiles apart from when he is counting Pinkies - £50 notes).

          He won't impart what he uses to remove the epoxy, but it can be dissolved.

          I suggest perhaps a web search.

          Here's a starter https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-remove-epoxy/

          Pip Pip Cheerio

          Malcolm

          Comment


          • Teppotai
            Teppotai commented
            Editing a comment
            Wow! Among the many things on that list that I need to source it says ‘pot’.

            Good to know that it’s not impregnable and it CAN be busted! (Luckily for me though, the former custodian could not even use epoxy correctly. It seems that this person did not clean the surfaces to be bonded. When it finally gave, I realized how scared I had been of the power of modern glues.)
            Last edited by Teppotai; 01-19-2020, 10:27 AM.

        • #38
          In Ogawa San’s book of accessories there are a couple of examples that must have come from the same workshop.

          A07C756D-ED61-4C67-88C7-B622465CF908.jpeg

          BFE620BA-6309-4A93-95C5-F79182CC2C7C.jpeg

          Piers D - Japan / UK

          Comment


          • #39
            And mine have gone from this,

            90192FD7-6FB6-4822-AB48-69709C67B8A2.jpeg
            to...

            Oh, by the way, the answers to 1 and 2 above were:

            1. Bad. They are well worn and had bits missing. The black one lacked a top cap. The gold/red one lacked both neck brace and cap. Both had bamboo caps and modern white packaging strings. They were expensive.
            2. Good. The bodies of both are solid and covered in finely-stitched and lacqered leather, said to be from Himeji, famous for its leather. No holes or rips. Besides the bodies, they both had their inner platforms, and their ruffs and pouring tubes which are very hard to replace authentically. Both also had their original pins, which though not vital, are often missing and actually quite troublesome to make.
            Last edited by Teppotai; 01-21-2020, 08:11 AM.
            Piers D - Japan / UK

            Comment


            • #40
              Spot on!
              We must say that these beautiful and at the time expensive flask, was property of high-ranking samurai. Many of the Daimyo had amongst their hatamoto-ranked samurai, people which was designated as ”official loader of the lord’s matchlock”. I can imagine that high-ranking samurai below the rank of Daimyo, had something similar and that these flask were used during these ”official” displays. Also wearing these flasks during the Sankin kotai parades, must have been popular.

              Jan
              Jan - Sweden

              Comment


              • Teppotai
                Teppotai commented
                Editing a comment
                What you say makes sense, Jan. A gorgeous gunpowder flask might indeed have signified status, to be worn proudly. The act of loading your Lord's gun would have been performed with meditative concentration, though, as any misfire would be on your head!
                Last edited by Teppotai; 01-21-2020, 08:53 AM.
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